Minimalism and Mental Solitude

“Without great solitude no serious work is possible.”

―Pablo Picasso

NOTE: This is the second of a two-part series on Minimalism and Solitude. Click here to check out the first.

Once upon a time, humans searched for information. Now, information searches humans.

As a matter of fact, information searches humans thoroughly. Regardless of who you are or where you might be, it will find you and showcase you its contents. Kind of like the world’s most persistent salesperson in a way, and ― depending on how you view it ― could be a blessing or a curse.

And today, information is no longer a stream, but an ocean with (nearly) everyone immersed in it. Everywhere you go is a battleground of noise, advertisements and endless media disruptions. All these clutter our head, and unnecessarily causes us to deviate from our goals and dreams.

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Minimalism and Social Solitude

“I have never found a companion that was so companionable as solitude.”
― Henry David Thoreau

NOTE: This is the first of a two-part series on Minimalism and Solitude. Click here to check out part 2.

If there’s a choice between being exposed to cacophonies in massive events and reading a good book at home, I’ll most definitely opt for the latter (I have a high Introversion preference). Being an introvert, solitude is becoming a necessity for me. Not only does it “recharge” myself for the all-time-loud-and-exhausting school hours the following day, but it also helps me focus more on tasks at hand, and getting to know more of myself (questioning myself on important personal matters, stuff like that). Solitude, however, is not confined to introverts. Extroverts need them as well, though not as much as introverts need them. Everyone needs solitude to find rest away from our busy everyday lives and contemplate on life-shaping decisions (such as deciding which university to attend, which is unfortunately pretty complicated).

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